Kip Jones

KIP JONES, an American by birth, has been studying and working in the UK for more than 15 years.
Under the umbrella term of 'arts-based research', his main efforts have involved developing tools
from the arts and humanities for use by social scientists in research and its impact on a wider
public or a Perfomative Social Science.

Jones is Reader in Performative Social Science and Director of the Centre for Qualitative Research
at Bournemouth University. Kip has produced films and written many articles for academic
journals and authored chapters for books on topics such as masculinity, ageing and rurality,
and older LGBT citizens. His ground-breaking use of qualitative methods, including
biography and auto-ethnography, and the use of tools from the arts in social science research and
dissemination are well-known.

Jones acted as Author and Executive Producer of
the award-winning short film,
RUFUS STONE, funded by Research Councils UK.
The film is now available for
free viewing on the Internet and has been
viewed by more than 11,000 people in 150
countries over the past year alone.

Areas of expertise
• Close relationships, culture and ethnicity
• Social psychology, sociology
• Ageing, self and identity
• Interpersonal processes, personality,
individual differences,
social networks, prejudice and stereotyping
• Sexuality and sexual orientation
• Creativity and the use of the
arts in Social Science

Media experience
His work has been reported widely
in the media, including:
BBC Radio 4,BBC TV news,Times
Higher Education, Sunday New
York Times, International
Herald-Tribune
and The Independent.

Wednesday, 14 September 2016

RUFUS STONE to be Highlighted at ESRC Festival of Learning 7 November

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Over the past five years, RUFUS STONE has been viewed in  academic, community and sevice provider settings throughout the U.K. Uploaded to the Internet for just over a year, the film was viewed on line by more that 12 thousand viewers in 150 countries.  It has won serveral film festival awards and was shortlisted for the AHRC Anniversary Prize in 2015.
The three-year research project behind the film’s success was part of the New Dynamics Programme of ageing in 21st Century Britain, supported by Research Councils UK. This event will hallmark this achievement and continue the film’s impact in the wider community.
We expect the gala event to atract an audience of the film’s cast and crew members, past participants in the research project, community workers and service providers, and a range of citizens, young and old,  gay and straight, with an interest in LGBT history and the contributions that the film has made to myriad diversity efforts. Whether you have seen the film before, or this will be the first time on a large theatre screen, you will enjoy the occasion.

Places are limited. Early registration is recommended.  https://rufusstonefilm.eventbrite.co.uk

 

Tuesday, 8 March 2016

Bournemouth's Centre for Qualitative Research Partners with The Qualitative Report


Bournemouth University’s Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR) is proud to announce its developing association with the online, qualitative journal, The Qualitative Report (TQR). Electronically published from Nova-Southeastern University in Florida, the journal was the first of its kind in both qualitative research and open-access publication solely on the Internet. The journal also publishes The Weekly Qualitative Report to subscribers.


CQR is envisioned as a resource for qualitative research across departments and faculties at Bournemouth University. TQR is particularly well placed to support CQR in these efforts, with its cross-discipline approach in leading-edge, qualitative publication.

CQR is particularly interested in participation in a specific TQR editorship rubric. The scheme will offer BU academics and postgrad students the opportunity to develop their editorial skills through a three-tier process of Assistant, Associate and then finally, full Editor of the journal. Further details will follow shortly.

Additional developments are also in the pipeline: possible publication in TQR Books; participation in TQR’s Annual Qualitative Conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, either in person or virtually; participation in Nova’s qualitative webinar series; joint research grant applications with Nova; and participation in the Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Research.

The Qualitative Report Editor-in-Chief Dr. Ron Chenail stated, “I see a future for Bournemouth and TQR supporting each other, particularly in innovation and forward-looking education, research and publication.”

Dr. Kip Jones, Director of CQR, remarked: “TQR was one of the first journals to publish my work postdoc. Rather than simply reject my early attempt at a submission, the editors worked with me to construct the best possible version of my paper on systematic review of qualitative data. It was published by TQR in 2004 and is the most frequently cited paper of all of my publications to date.”

TQR Editorial Statement
The Qualitative Report (ISSN 1052-0147) is a peer-reviewed, on-line monthly journal devoted to writing and discussion of and about qualitative, critical, action, and collaborative inquiry and research. The Qualitative Report, the oldest multidisciplinary qualitative research journal in the world, serves as a forum and sounding board for researchers, scholars, practitioners, and other reflective-minded individuals who are passionate about ideas, methods, and analyses permeating qualitative, action, collaborative, and critical study. These pages are open to a variety of forms: original, scholarly activity such as qualitative research studies, critical commentaries, editorials, or debates concerning pertinent issues and topics; news of networking and research possibilities; and other sorts of journalistic and literary shapes which may interest and pique readers.

The Qualitative Report is published by Nova Southeastern University. Its Uniform Resource Locator (URL) is http://nsuworks.nova.edu/tqr/

TQR Index and Listing Information
The Qualitative Report is indexed in Scopus, Google Scholar, ERIC, Cambridge Scientific Abstract‘s (CSA) Web Resources Database (WRD) for the Social Sciences, Gale’s Academic OneFile, EBSCO Open Access Journals, Open Science Directory, SocioSite, and All Academic. (Abbreviated list)

Update: Nova Southeastern University, the home of The Qualitative Report, has been listed by Times Higher Education of one of the 20 'Rising Stars' amongst global universities.  The Times said that those listed are  “globally aware and outward-looking ... and focus on innovation including harnessing new partnerships".  CQR at Bournemouth University is proud to be one of Nova's partners!

Keep in touch with further developments in this exciting association on the CQR webpages, HSS blog or follow CQR on Twitter: @BUQualitative

Sunday, 6 March 2016

You wake up and suddenly, a story is right in front of you.

A very formal email from the Editor of the International Encyclopedia of Communication Research Methods greeted me first thing this morning: it’s their pleasure to officially accept my manuscript for the Encyclopedia. I have been working on this entry for about a year now, yet still must wait another year for its publication.

Breakfast a Tiffany’s came out in the year I graduated from high school. My parents were both proud high school graduates from large families where a 12-year education was at a premium, yet achieved by both of my parents in the middle of a depression.

But I was going off to college next, a dream of our father’s—that we all got more education than he ever had. So I headed for the unofficial high school graduation party, got drunk for the very first time that night, and drove my Dad’s Caddy home—very slowly, very carefully. At the end of the summer, I went off to a small liberal arts college, more to please my father than me.

My favourite scene in Breakfast is where the young author takes Holly to the library and shows her his name in the card catalogue. I waited nearly half a lifetime for that experience for myself, then they got rid of the card catalogue and everything turned electronic.

The bookcase is behind me.

My father bought the World Book Encyclopedia for us as children. We would use it to write homework assignments for school. Later, in my teens, he bought the Great Books of the Western World as well. The two sets of volumes sat in a low bookcase opposite the front doorway to our ranch house in the countryside. I would lay of the floor in front of the bookcase, often flipping through incomprehensible volumes by Homer or Thomas Aquinas, enjoying the smell of print on paper, and playing with our French bulldog, Jackie. (In the photograph, left, I seem to be more interested in an LP record than the encyclopedias on the shelves.)

I liked the World Book better because there were pictures and it spoke in plain English to this unsophisticated country boy. I still prefer books with pictures to this day. Actually, I included one in my manuscript for the Encyclopedia of Communication Research Methods, but things got complicated along the way about rights and then, finally, how apropos the photo was for the text, so it was left out. I think an illustration should draw the reader into the text, create the possibility of an encounter with it. Trick the left side of the brain to engage with the right.

The previous edition of the 12-volume set of these compendia ran about £2500 so I cannot see myself owning a full set of the Encyclopedia of Communication myself. Perhaps the single volume Research Methods will be available and more affordable on its own. Thank god I forgot to have children so I won’t suffer the guilt of not having the set to show them. I am not even sure at this point if I would be able to convince my University’s library to buy the whole set. I can imagine the scene, though, going to see it for the first time myself, perhaps taking a friend, and fingering my 4,000-word entry on “Performative Social Science” in its assigned volume, enjoying a sniff or two of the paper, the ink, and the glue of it. An electronic version, to which I will be privileged to have access is promised, but could never be the same as a volume in my hands.

At this very same time, we are upon a (yet another?) retro period in mode, fashion, lifestyle, cinema and even television series. Suddenly, the disgust generated by Brutalist architecture has turned rather strangely to a kind of warmth, even fondness for it in retrospect. “Mid-Century Modern”—everything is popping up everywhere. Suddenly advised to be suspicious of electronic recording, vinyl is once again hot, hot, hot.  Even cassette tapes seem poised for a rebound. Get your pencils and pens ready to tighten those tapes!

Perhaps it is time to think about “analogue” in publication as well. Completely turned off by PowerPoint presentations ad nauseam, an undergrad class recently cheered in unison when I introduced a lecture with, “Today, there will be no PowerPoints”. On another occasion, opening a workshop, I passed around some materials printed on paper and commented, “This is a piece of paper. There are words on it. You can hold them in you hands. Enjoy the sensation.”

What if there were a sudden wistfulness and renewed respect for the Dewey Decimal system, the card catalogue, and printed books with spines and hard covers? Or perhaps at least electronic publications will come with an accompanying scratch n sniff card, à la John Waters? Could all this be a popular nostalgic trend? 

Will Audrey Hepburn be making a trip to the library card catalogue with me after all?

Tiffany's salesman: Do they still really have prizes in Cracker Jack boxes?
Paul Varjak: Oh yes.
Tiffany's salesman: That's nice to know... It gives one a feeling of solidarity, almost of continuity with the past, that sort of thing.

 Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) Truman Capote (based on the novel by), George Axelrod (screenplay)

Thursday, 25 February 2016

“Flip it!” –Kip Jones’ most frequent workshop advice

Attendants at the Creative Writing for Academics Workshop at Bournemouth University. Some hold copies of the photograph from which they created a story.

-->The most frequent advice from Kip Jones to participants was “Flip it!”

“Flip it!” –Kip Jones’ most frequent workshop advice 

Recently, 27 academics, some from as far away as upstate New York and Dublin, gathered for the 

 Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones at Bournemouth University (BU). 

Their goal was two days of experimentation with writing techniques to engender more creative 

outputs in their academic writing.

The conclusion of one participant reflected the sentiments of many:  
"The Creative Writing for Academics workshop turned out to be a great experience, more than expected!!"

The two-day workshop was organised by BU’s Centre for Qualitative Research
and was promoted thusly:
“This unique event isn’t a typical writing retreat (with trees to hug and lots of time to ruminate), but a very active experience with exercises, suggestions and supportive feedback on participants’ work…”

Instead of taking 30 minutes or more to go round the room and let
everyone make an introduction (listing job titles, universities, 
theses topics, etc. ad infinitum), Jones asked attendees to take 
15 minutes and write their life story on a postcard instead. 
This is an exercise that comes directly from Michael Kimball’s 
work,  Michael Kimball Writes Your Life Story (on a postcard) 
Kimball is an American novelist whose writing Jones admires.  
A few examples from Kimball’s postcard book were shared 
with the group.   Each participant then wrote her/his own life story 
on a postcard; afterwards, some of the attendants then shared 
their stories with the group. 

Jones then explained tags, log lines and treatments—copywriting techniques used in 
advertising and film-making.

The Workshop as a Logline: Participants were challenged to write their “Life on a postcard”, 
they were introduced to creating tags and log lines; homework was to write a poem based on a dream. 
Next, they created a story from a photograph.  Finally, they shared their stories with others 
who had used the same photo. (50 words)
 
Tag: “Artistic types take their time … in an Italian trattoria.” 

Participants then had a go at creating tags and loglines for academic articles that they brought with them.   
This was an exercise in using simple sentences, reducing content to its essence and creating copy 
that could be used in titles and the body of articles, in blogs and on Twitter.

Jones used a relaxed and open-ended process throughout the workshop. Francesca Cavallerio’s 
extended feedback report captures the essence of the responses of many to this approach to the workshop:
I enjoyed the freedom that came from writing creatively, without prescriptions. Having no other goal than the story/poem itself was intimidating initially, but then turned into an amazing experience. I think (the workshop) allowed me to discover a few things about myself and the way I write. Also, by listening to what others wrote, and realizing how many different ways of writing exist, and how much I enjoyed each of them, gave me an increased sense of freedom and possibility
I was expecting more “directions”, tips on “how to use creative writing in academia”. But now that we are at the end of the workshop, I think I can see  why it was organised in this way.  Yesterday, I would have said, “Yes, I wanted to be guided more”. Today, I am actually very happy of the structure and everything I learned, felt and experienced here. Francesca Cavallerio, St. Mary’s University, Twickenham.

The last morning of the workshop consisted of reading some of the poems  that were written overnight. 
Attendees then chose from amongst 11 black and white photographs. The brief was to write a story 
about what the photograph was about. The only instruction was that often a photograph could represent 
the moment between what led up to the event captured and what might happen next. The group took 
the rest of themorning to write the photo-based 1,000 word stories. After lunch, they assembled in 
groups of three (each group having chosen the same photo) andcompared stories and outcomes.

 “I feel a sense of satisfaction in having written a life-story postcard, a poem and a short story—all very personal.” –Anne Quinney, Bournemouth University
The workshop was envisaged as a way to help academics with publishing in the wider world of blogs 
and online outlets, moving work to mixed media, auto-ethnography, and even fiction, radio and film. 
Jones gave ideas of the kinds of blogs and even journals that are receptive to creative academic work. 
He shared experiences with his own outputs and finding like-minded editors with whom to work.

The intellectual exchanges encouraged joint exploration on how academics can engage with principles 
 and tools from the arts in order to expand and extend their possibilities of dissemination of their work. 
 Concepts of creativity itself evolved and were transformed by participants’ outlooks and willingness 
to engage with unfamiliar territory. These processes comprised a ‘facilitated learning’—in that 
knowledge was gained as a secondary goal through a process of developing new relationships. 
This was achieved through individual and small group problem-solving and self-examination, 
grounded in personal past experience and knowledge.


Recently, 27 academics, some from as far away as upstate New York and Dublin, gathered for the Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones at Bournemouth University (BU). Their goal was two days of experimentation with writing techniques to engender more creative outputs in their academic writing.

The conclusion of one participant reflected the sentiments of many: “The Creative Writing for Academics workshop turned out to be a great experience, more than expected!!”
The two-day workshop was organised by BU’s Centre for Qualitative Research, and was promoted thusly:
“This unique event isn’t a typical writing retreat (with trees to hug and lots of time to ruminate), but a very active experience with exercises, suggestions and supportive feedback on participants’ work…”
- See more at: http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2016/02/25/flip-it-kip-jones-most-frequent-workshop-advice/#sthash.hR1DqZja.dpuf

Recently, 27 academics, some from as far away as upstate New York and Dublin, gathered for the Creative Writing for Academics with Kip Jones at Bournemouth University (BU). Their goal was two days of experimentation with writing techniques to engender more creative outputs in their academic writing.

The conclusion of one participant reflected the sentiments of many: “The Creative Writing for Academics workshop turned out to be a great experience, more than expected!!”
The two-day workshop was organised by BU’s Centre for Qualitative Research, and was promoted thusly:
“This unique event isn’t a typical writing retreat (with trees to hug and lots of time to ruminate), but a very active experience with exercises, suggestions and supportive feedback on participants’ work…”
- See more at: http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2016/02/25/flip-it-kip-jones-most-frequent-workshop-advice/#sthash.hR1DqZja.dpuf
The most frequent advice from Kip Jones to participants was “Flip it!” “Flip it!” –Kip Jones’ most frequent workshop advice. - See more at: http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2016/02/25/flip-it-kip-jones-most-frequent-workshop-advice/#sthash.hR1DqZja.dpuf
The most frequent advice from Kip Jones to participants was “Flip it!” “Flip it!” –Kip Jones’ most frequent workshop advice. - See more at: http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2016/02/25/flip-it-kip-jones-most-frequent-workshop-advice/#sthash.hR1DqZja.dpuf
Attendants at the Creative Writing for Academics Workshop at Bournemouth University. Some hold copies of the photograph from which they created a story. - See more at: http://blogs.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/2016/02/25/flip-it-kip-jones-most-frequent-workshop-advice/#sthash.hR1DqZja.dpuf

Sunday, 10 January 2016

Swimming Pool Mélologue

The brief was thus: "Each participant gives a maximum 5 minute ONE SLIDE presentation about their research aspirations for the coming years". I chose Scene 1. from "Copacetica", a feature-length film that I am writing. A 'mélologue' is a spoken declamation with musical accompaniment or a soundscape, developed by the composer, Berlioz. I liked this idea. I have also been thinking a lot about Michael Haneke's use of lingering shots and stillness past the action or dialogue of a scene, so wanted to play a bit with that here. Rewriting the script directions, etc. for a narration definitely helped in refining the script itself.

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Set in the 1960s, Copacetica's themes include being different, the celebration of being an outsider, seeing oneself from outside of the “norm”, and the interior conflicts of “coming out” within a continuum as a (gay) male in a straight world. These observations are set within the flux and instability of a period of great social change, but which are often viewed in retrospect as consistent and definable. Being straight or being gay can also be viewed in a similar way within the wider culture’s need to set up a sexual binary and force sexual “choice” decision-making for the benefit of the majority culture. Through the device of the fleeting moment, the story interrogates the certainties and uncertainties of the “norms” of modernity.

View the short film here 

Read the Five-minute Script here 


Friday, 8 January 2016

Centre for Qualitative Research Approved and Moves Forward

The Centre for Qualitative has received approval to continue as a Research Centre within Bournemouth University and will be led by  Kip Jones as Centre Director and Caroline Ellis-Hill  as Deputy Director. The Centre will be part of the new Department of Health Sciences & Public Health in the Faculty of Health & Social Sciences. Members are welcome from across departments and faculties at BU.

The Centre for Qualitative Research (CQR), a long-standing resource for research practice and postgraduate learning at BU, has recently undergone a ‘refit’ of its web pages.  Content from the old site has been moved over to the new platform for Bournemouth University groups and centres. The new format now makes it possible to link with work taking place in other Schools and research sites. In addition, Impact, Public Engagement and Postgraduate Research links feature on every page.
CQR is held in high esteem globally for its innovative work and commitment to qualitative research. The refreshed web pages provide an international ‘shop window’ for CQR, School of Health & Social Care and BU more generally in regards to cutting-edge qualitative work. CQR has always engaged across Schools at BU and welcomes new opportunities for collaborate efforts.
The new CQR pages include information, resources and links organised around the following areas of research:
In addition, areas such as Biographic Narrative Interpretive Research, Cut-up Technique and Appreciative Inquiry are covered. A new page outlining the ‘Gay and Pleasant Land? Project and Rufus Stone’ has been added. The recently organised, cross-Schools ARTS in RESEARCH (AiR) collaboration is also featured.
The new web pages include new information and resources, links to further information and even videos for viewing pleasure! Last but not least, a photo has been added as a ‘Featured Image’ highlighting the essence of each page.

Have a look around this interesting site!


Monday, 7 December 2015

“Social Media for Academics” Lunchtime Taster Session


Ever wondered about social media for academics? Join us for an informal chat about the possibilities on Friday 8 January in Room 508 Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth University 12:30-2:00 p.m. 

Feel free to bring your lunch.

This will be a great way to finish up HSS’s ‘Writing Week’ with some practical tips on reaching wider audiences with your outputs through the likes of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, etc/ and/or your own personal blog or other blogs and web-based publications already up and running.

This will also be a ‘Taster Session’ for the upcoming “Creative Writing for Academics” two-day workshop in February. It is not necessary to be booked for that, however, but rather an opportunity to get an idea of what you might explore further at that workshop.

Kip Jones, who made London School of Economics’ list of favourite academic tweeters, will run the Taster Session. Kip was also listed among JISC’s 50 most influential UK higher education professionals on social media.

What they say at JISC: “Kip’s blog, ‘KIPWORLD’, covers a wide range of topics from advice on writing a PhD thesis to insight into his creative process. He regularly uses his blog, Facebook and Twitter to share his research (with) others.

Kip also contributes to the LSE Impact blog, LSE Review of Books, Discovery Society, Sociological Imagination, Creative Quarter, The Creativity Post and the Bournemouth University Research Blog.

Mark your calendars today so that you don’t forget the date over the holidays!

Social Media for Academics: Friday, 8 January, 12:30 RLH 508

Note: This session is mostly for academics at BU, but feel free to crash it if you'd like.

Further reading:
“Q&A: Kip Jones on the Art of Academic Blogging”

Sunday, 15 November 2015

Proustifications on Paris

The first time I went to France (by way of winning a small prize) I was teeming with
anticipation and a sense of adventure. I had never been away from my native America
before and was filled with expectations. If I lived frugally, I surmised at the time, I would be

able to stay in Paris for more than three months. I prepared for, consequently, the luxury
of exploring Paris in an unhurried way that would allow the city and its occupants to reveal
themselves to me in a natural, unfolding way.

Paris unveiled itself to me gradually. I spent a lot of time camped out in cafés, watching
and meeting people. It was in observing passers-by that I particularly noticed other
Americans on ‘holiday abroad’ charging from place to place, trying desperately to make all
the appropriate stops at the necessary high spots of Paris, attempting to take everything in
and doing all this within a very short visit. In the throws of this often-frantic process, my
countrymen and women would frequently become quite annoyed with the Parisian French.
Annoyed because they (the French) did not speak English, annoyed because their ways of
doing things –their culture—was not the same as the American way. Surely they (the
French Parisians) understood that they (the Americans) had a lot to accomplish in a short
time and that they (the French and their culture) were only making the process that much
more difficult!

The reality of the experiences of many Americans abroad is subsequently reinvented when
they return home. Like art museum visitors who are more comfortable with the
reproductions found in the museum shop (they can buy them) than the art in the galleries,
the narratives of Americans’ trips abroad are typically reconstructed through photographs
stateside. They are, habitually, not assured that their journey was a success until they
assemble their holiday photographic slideshow, reconstructing the story of their journey
into a perceived reality. The defining moment, crucial to their reconstruction of reality, is
the moment when they are reassured that they visited, in this instance, the right Paris.
This is accomplished when family and friends agree that yes, they were at the right places
because those were the same places that they too visited or certainly would visit. At last,
after a long journey fraught with unexpected inconveniences, language barriers, unfamiliar
terrain and food, peppered with what many American tourists misconstrue as the French
penchant for rudeness, they can finally sleep restfully in their American beds. Paris was a
success.

Paris for me was different from that. Perhaps it was the luxury of the time available to me
to slow my pace down to fit the pace of Parisian life. Perhaps it was by finding the
timeframe in which to generate discovery and allow Paris to reveal itself to me. I recall
that at the end of my stay there, I did rush around to some of the tourist spots that I had
never bothered to visit (even the Louvre, I must admit!) and snap photos of myself posed
in front of miscellaneous monuments of French culture. I did this, ironically, in order to
have photos to show family and friends back home. Yes, they too might wonder if I had
ever been to Paris at all, if I had no photos of the places they had attended on their trips.
A few days before my departure from France my lover at the time, whom I had met in a
Parisian café, said, “You haven’t even been outside of Paris the whole time you’ve been
here! We must take the train to Versailles!” We departed the following morning, arriving at
Versailles in a light but steady rain. We walked the crunchy gravel grounds of Versailles
for a while, noted the long queues for the palace and made a dash back to the village of
Versailles and a small bistro/café. We sat for hours at a table talking, just under a window,
the rain beating its steady rhythm on the leaded panes. It was not exactly Madeleines
dipped in tea, but it very well might have been. We sipped slowly these last moments,
savouring them for memories. We both knew that the palace of Versailles would have to
wait for another time; the pain of imminent separation was far more monumental than any
French palace could be. I have been glad of that day since, and retell the story often.

When one approaches a journey slowly and with a sense of expectation at every turn, the
journey is never really completed. Fortunately, I was able to return to Paris many times
after that first visit. I believe today that it was the way I approached my first stay that
provided the longing to return, the opportunities to return.


Copyright Kip Jones 2007